The Molecular Oncogenesis [MONC] Study Section reviews applications that focus on basic mechanisms regulating early molecular and cellular events that lead to immortalization, transformation and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is on evaluation of the mechanisms converting the normal stem and/or differentiated cell to a cell fully capable of causing cancer. Studies focusing on the disruption of normal cellular function, proliferation, differentiation, homeostasis and senescence to analyze transformation and early oncogenesis are reviewed by this study section.

 

The List of Reviewers lists all present, whether permanent or temporary, to provide the full scope of expertise present on that date. Lists are posted 30 days before the meeting and are tentative, pending any last minute changes.

Review Dates

Membership Panel

The membership panel is a list of chartered members only.

Topics


  • Characterization of putative oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes or alterations in their expression, regulation or function that contribute to transformation and oncogenesis
  • Mechanisms and/or alterations in signal transduction and cell cycle pathways that modulate or lead to transformation and oncogenesis
  • Mechanisms and/or alterations of protein stability that contribute to transformation and oncogenesis including post-translational modifications such as ubiquitylation, acetylation, or sumoylation
  • Identification and characterization of cancer stem cells and transformation pathways >
  • Development and investigation of embryonic stem cell, reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell, cancer stem cell, patient-derived xenograft (PDX), organotypic and animal model systems to study transformation and oncogenesis

Shared Interests

There are shared interests with Cancer Molecular Pathobiology [CAMP] in the investigation of oncogenes, tumor suppressors and cancer stem cells. Grant applications that focus on cellular transformation and early oncogenesis mediated by oncogenes, tumor suppressors and cancer stem cells, especially those focused on mechanisms of post-translational regulation, may be assigned to MONC. Applications that focus on epigenetic, transcriptional or translational regulation mechanisms mediated by oncogenes, tumor suppressors and cancer stem cells may be assigned to CAMP.

There are shared interests with Cancer Etiology [CE] in the investigation of post-translational modifications such as ubiquitylation or sumoylation. Grant applications that investigate post-translational modification processes that contribute to cellular transformation and early oncogenesis may be assigned to MONC. Applications that investigate post-translational modification in the context of DNA damage/repair may be assigned to CE.

There are shared interests with Tumor Cell Biology [TCB] in the investigation of signaling transduction cellular metabolism. Grant applications that focus on signal transduction or metabolism involved in cellular transformation and early oncogenesis may be assigned to MONC. Applications that focus on signal transduction or metabolism in cancer cells and tumors may be assigned to TCB.

There are shared interests with Cellular Signaling and Regulatory Systems [CSRS] in the investigation of signaling pathways, post-translational modifications and cell cycle. Grant applications that focus on these processes in transformation and early oncogenesis may be assigned to MONC. Applications that use cancer cells as a model to study these processes may be assigned to CSRS.

There are shared interests with Molecular and Cellular Hematology [MCH] in blood cancers. Grant applications that focus on cellular transformation and early oncogenic mechanisms in hematological malignancies may be assigned to MONC. Applications that focus pre-leukemia and hematopoiesis in the leukemic environment may be assigned to MCH.

There are shared interests with Mechanisms of Cancer Therapeutics-1 [MCT1] in cancer therapeutic agents. Grant applications that use anti-neoplastic agents as tools to examine transformation and early oncogenesis may be assigned to MONC. Applications that focus on the mechanisms of action of anti-neoplastic agents may be assigned to MCT1.